Harold and the Poopy Little Puppy

Author: Ellie Crowe
Illustrator: Janet King
Published: August 31, 2018
26 Pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Date Read: November 11, 2018
Jessica’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:

It’s hard to be a good dog, but Harold, the golden retriever, really tries. Then the Dad brings home Prince, a silly little puppy that the Dad says is smart and brave.

Prince! “Smart and brave!” Harold can hardly believe his ears! And, even worse, when Prince does a doggy-doo right in the house, the Dad blames Harold!

Harold thinks Prince is a poopy little puppy. How is he going to live with him in his house?

Jessica’s Review:

Harold is just living his ‘happy-go-lucky’ life as a golden retriever when Dad brings home a new puppy named Prince.  Harold has to adjust to all the changes that come along with Prince,  which includes taking the blame for the things Prince does. This includes a huge No No: Pooping on the floor!  Prince seemingly takes over Harold’s  space and gets all of the attention unless Harold is getting fussed at.

There are parallels to this story and  the feelings a child may experience when a new sibling arrives.  **Spoiler alert** There will be tension until mutual feelings occur as they do at the end of this story.

This story is for children ages 6-8 years old.  There are pictures at the beginning of each chapter to help tell the story.  If you know kids who like dogs, or may have a new sibling arriving, then this would be the book for them.

I enjoyed this children’s book and liked Harold. If I had kids, I would most likely get them this book. Harold is very likeable and I can see (and hope) Crowe writes more adventures starring him.

**Many thanks to the author Ellie Crowe for sending me a copy to review!**

 

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Orphan Monster Spy by Matt Killeen

Author: Matt Killeen
Published:  March 20, 2018
423 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

A Jewish girl-turned-spy must infiltrate an elite Nazi boarding school in this highly commercial, relentlessly nail-biting World War II drama!

After her mother is shot at a checkpoint, fifteen-year-old Sarah–blonde, blue-eyed, and Jewish–finds herself on the run from a government that wants to see every person like her dead. Then Sarah meets a mysterious man with an ambiguous accent, a suspiciously bare apartment, and a lockbox full of weapons. He’s a spy, and he needs Sarah to become one, too, to pull off a mission he can’t attempt on his own: infiltrate a boarding school attended by the daughters of top Nazi brass, befriend the daughter of a key scientist, and steal the blueprints to a bomb that could destroy the cities of Western Europe. With years of training from her actress mother in the art of impersonation, Sarah thinks she’s ready. But nothing prepares her for her cutthroat schoolmates, and soon she finds herself in a battle for survival unlike any she’d ever imagined.

Kim’s Review:

This book was slightly disappointing to me. I had just finished the exhilarating Resistance by Nielsen; I got this book brand new off the shelf at Barnes and Noble, and the cover is so beautiful, so I picked it up right away. I know it’s not fair to compare books, so I’m going to try not to. Orphan Monster Spy just felt shallow to me. I didn’t feel any real connection to Sarah.

The story itself was good, but often times it felt inconsequential. By the time I finished it, it was empty, I felt very little. I really didn’t like the way Sarah was constantly comparing herself to the Nazis. It annoyed me that someone who was standing up against a regime that was so obviously evil, could then put herself into the same category as the “monsters” she was trying to fight. Killing someone who is about to kill an innocent person does not put you on the same level as the killer. I like having clearer distinctions of morality and this book suffered because it didn’t have those distinctions. It kept my attention well enough and I did like certain things about the story. Certain circumstances came to light to show just how evil individual Nazis were, and I liked the perspective of condemning not just the Nazi organization, but individuals as well. Seeing the brutal standards that the Nazi held not just for themselves but for their children was interesting.

I think my favorite part of the book was when Sarah participated in the River Run. She showed courage and cleverness and it was the one time in the book where I actually found myself rooting for her. I am glad I read this book, I did learn a little from it, but I don’t plan on reading it again and I can’t really bring myself to recommend it.

 Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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Isaac Marion’s Warm Bodies series finale: The Living is available NOW!

After nearly a decade of hard work, Isaac Marion has brought us The Living, the final book in the Warm Bodies Series:

In February of 2009, Marion printed the first 100 copies of Warm Bodies at a local print shop and started selling them on his website.  Later came a feature film and a long, difficult publishing journey which brought him full circle: He is independently publishing, printing, and selling the final book, The Living, on his own and it is out today!!!  You can order The Living here in hardback or e-book. I ordered my copy and can not wait for it to arrive!

I first listened to the audio book of Warm Bodies with my husband (at the time we were just dating) in September of 2010 when we were heading to Florida for our first vacation and we both really enjoyed it.   I need to read it again and the rest in the series! 

Book Description:

The New York Times bestselling Warm Bodies Series has captivated readers in twenty-five languages, inspiring a major film and transcending the zombie genre to become something “poetic” (Library Journal) “highly original” (Seattle Times) and “ultimately moving” (Time Out London). Now the story of a dead man’s search for life reaches its conclusion on a scale both epic and intimate.

Before he was a flesh-eating corpse, R was something worse. He remembers it all now, a life of greed and apathy more destructive than any virus, and he sees only one path to redemption: he must fight the forces he helped create. But what can R, Julie, and their tiny gang of fugitives do against the creeping might of the Axiom Group, the bizarre undead corporation that’s devouring what’s left of America?

It’s time for a road trip.

No more flyover country. This time they’ll face the madness on the ground, racing their RV across the wastelands as tensions rise and bonds unravel—because R isn’t the only one hiding painful secrets. Everyone is on their own desperate search: for a kidnapped daughter, a suicidal mother, and an abused little boy with a gift that could save humanity…if humanity can convince him it’s worth saving.

All roads lead home, to a final confrontation with the plague and its shareholders. But this is a monster that guns can’t kill. A battle only one weapon can win…

The rest of the series:

Warm Bodies:
270 pages

“R” is having a no-life crisis—he is a zombie. He has no memories, no identity, and no pulse, but he is a little different from his fellow Dead. He may occasionally eat people, but he’d rather be riding abandoned airport escalators, listening to Sinatra in the cozy 747 he calls home, or collecting souvenirs from the ruins of civilization.

And then he meets a girl.

First as his captive, then his reluctant house guest, Julie is a blast of living color in R’s gray landscape, and something inside him begins to bloom. He doesn’t want to eat this girl—although she looks delicious—he wants to protect her. But their unlikely bond will cause ripples they can’t imagine, and their hopeless world won’t change without a fight.

Isaac Marion’s genre-defying Warm Bodies series startled the literary world with its poignant subversion of the zombie mythos, inspiring a major film adaptation and being translated into twenty-seven languages.

The New Hunger (Prequel novella):
193 pages

The must-read prequel to the “highly original” (The Seattle Times) New York Times bestseller Warm Bodies—now a major motion picture—from the author whose genre-defying debut turned the classic horror story on its head.

The end of the world didn’t happen overnight.

After years of societal breakdowns, wars and quakes and rising tides, humanity was already near the edge. Then came a final blow no one could have expected: all the world’s corpses rising up to make more.

Born into this bleak and bloody landscape, twelve-year-old Julie struggles to hold on to hope as she and her parents drive across the wastelands of America, a nightmarish road trip in search of a new home.

Hungry, lost, and scared, sixteen-year-old Nora finds herself her brother’s sole guardian after her parents abandon them in the not-quite-empty ruins of Seattle.

And in the darkness of a forest, a dead man opens his eyes. Who is he? What is he? With no clues beyond a red tie and the letter “R,” he must unravel the grim mystery of his existence—right after he learns how to think, how to walk, and how to satisfy the monster howling in his belly.

The New Hunger is a crucial link between Warm Bodies and The Burning World, a glimpse into the past that sets the stage for an astonishing future.

The Burning World:
513 pages

Being alive is hard. Being human is harder. But since his recent recovery from death, R is making progress. He’s learning how to read, how to speak, maybe even how to love, and the city’s undead population is showing signs of life. R can almost imagine a future with Julie, this girl who restarted his heart—building a new world from the ashes of the old one.

And then helicopters appear on the horizon. Someone is coming to restore order. To silence all this noise. To return things to the way they were, the good old days of stability and control and the strong eating the weak. The plague is ancient and ambitious, and the Dead were never its only weapon.

How do you fight an enemy that’s in everyone? Can the world ever really change? With their home overrun by madmen, R, Julie, and their ragged group of refugees plunge into the otherworldly wastelands of America in search of answers. But there are some answers R doesn’t want to find. A past life, an old shadow, crawling up from the basement.

About the Author (from his website)

Isaac Marion grew up in small towns around the Pacific Northwest, pursuing careers in writing, painting, and music until one of these finally sparked with the publication of his debut novel in 2010. WARM BODIES become a New York Times Bestseller, inspired a major film, and was translated into 25 languages. He spent the next eight years writing the rest of the story over the course of four books, now concluded with THE LIVING. He lives and writes on Orcas Island and plays music in Seattle with the band, Thing Quartet.

Now here are the fun facts from Isaac about Isaac:

I also write music, though it’s been a while. Here’s an album I did in 2007, it’s called DEAD CHILDREN.
I used to PAINT and was fairly serious about it for a minute, but I haven’t touched a brush in many years.
I am sinister (left handed) do not trust me.
My beard hides a doorway to a hidden world.
I live in a van more often that you might expect.
I have never won a contest or prize of any kind.
The house my family lived in when I was 14 (a modified motorcycle garage) was condemned and burned down by the city. That was the year I started writing.
My job history is long and puzzling.
One time I almost got decapitated.
One time I felt genuine emotion toward a cactus. (his name is Stabby and he is my son.)
I have enjoyed the company of all the following pets: dog, cat, rat, mouse, gerbil, guinea pig, grasshopper, rabbit, turtle, frog, snake, iguana, horse, goat, fish, snail, slug, salamander, and unknown lamprey-like creature discovered in the mud of the Skagit River.
I’m tall and it brings me great delight when little old ladies ask me to get things off high store shelves for them. Finally I have purpose.
I don’t really understand what anything is for and I suspect it’s not for anything but I think we can invent our own meaning and live in it, like writing and reading a story.
I have never traveled anywhere warm or pleasant, only desolate European wastelands, probably because some part of me doesn’t think I deserve a tropical beach.
My number one travel destination is Antartica. Bury me in the ice until the next age.
Let me know if you’re ever on Orcas Island! I’m friendly and approachable and I love coffee, haha, lol, ok see you later!

Contact Isaac:
Website
Twitter @isaacinspace
Tumblr
Instagram @isaacmarion

Trailer for the Warm Bodies movie: The book is so much more than this! 

 

 

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