Category: Review

#Single: Dating in the 21st Century

#single: Dating in the 21st Century
‘Author’: Lost the Plot

Published: November 1, 2018
170 Pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Date Read: January 2, 2019

Jessica’s Rating: 1 star

Book Description:
A collection of online dating conversations.

From bad pick-up lines to death threats and awkward sex-capades #single is a hilarious snapshot of some of the most ridiculous real-life online dating conversations.

This book is a must read if you match any of the below criteria:

– You are currently online dating
– You have online dated
– You will online date in your future
– You are a smug couple
– You worry your child is a spinster/bachelor for life
– You like to laugh
– You are a Jewish mother
– You like to breathe and live and stuff

Is it a perfect match? Swipe right (okay, click) and add it to your shopping cart.

Jessica’s Review:

#Single is a very quick read.  There is no introduction to the ‘book’ it just starts with ‘conversations’ and you as the reader have to figure out what is going on. According to the Amazon book description this book is based off the website TinderTuesday.com and as I was researching for my review I found this: the site is not even active anymore- in fact you can purchase the domain name if you wanted!  I also saw there was a Facebook and Twitter page and neither one have been updated in over a year.  Why was this copy and paste conversations put together as a ‘book’ I have no idea.    

Now that is out of the way….  #single gives you an idea of what dating now is like.  And I can say these conversations are…entertaining to read.  I feel for the people that are the recipients of these messages. If you have online dated in the past you will get some entertainment from this book.

This is like a coffee table book of entertainment if you wanted to buy it, but I would not recommend.  This is one you may want to read while you are in a waiting room for a doctor’s appointment  or waiting for a movie to start.  There is nothing really to gain from this ‘book’.

#Single is not recommended.

Thank you to Pantera Press and Lost the Plot for granting me a review copy via NetGalley. I wish I could have given a positive review.

Purchase Link:
Amazon US

Shadows of the Workhouse by Jennifer Worth

Call the Midwife: Shadows of the Workhouse
Author: Jennifer Worth
Published: June 30, 2008
Audible

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

In this follow up to CALL THE MIDWIFE, Jennifer Worth, a midwife working in the docklands area of East London in the 1950s tells more stories about the people she encountered.

There’s Jane, who cleaned and generally helped out at Nonnatus House – she was taken to the workhouse as a baby and was allegedly the illegitimate daughter of an aristocrat. Peggy and Frank’s parents both died within 6 months of each other and the children were left destitute. At the time, there was no other option for them but the workhouse. The Reverend Thornton-Appleby-Thorton, a missionary in Africa, visits the Nonnatus nuns and Sister Julienne acts as matchmaker. And Sister Monica Joan, the eccentric ninety-year-old nun, is accused of shoplifting some small items from the local market. She is let off with a warning, but then Jennifer finds stolen jewels from Hatton Garden in the nun’s room.

These stories give a fascinating insight into the resilience and spirit that enabled ordinary people to overcome their difficulties.

Kim’s Review:

Jennifer Worth is so good at portraying history in a way that helps you visualize it all happening. As a historian, there are some problems I have with her revelations . . . it’s hard to write about what another person is thinking when you weren’t there, but her storytelling methods are sound and effective.

This book focused more on the district nurses’ side of things in the East End of London. Learning about individuals who actually lived in the workhouses was fascinating. I am so jealous that she got to talk and interact with these people; I would give my right arm to have been able to meet them!

The long-term effect that the workhouses had on society astounded me. Older people refused to go to hospitals simply because those buildings used to be workhouses, all nearly thirty years since the workhouses closed! And my favorite figure in this collection of stories is old Mr. Collett. He was a war hero and a sweet, lonely old gentleman. The relationship that Jenny develops with him is heartwarming and informative and I found myself in tears when she wrote of his death. I absolutely recommend this as an educational tool in high school classrooms and to anyone who is interested in honest history.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

 

 

 

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Call the Midwife by Jennifer Worth

Call the Midwife: A Memoir of Birth, Joy and Hard Times
Author: Jennifer Worth

Published:  April 7, 2009
Audible

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

Viewers everywhere have fallen in love with this candid look at post-war London. In the 1950s, twenty-two-year-old Jenny Lee leaves her comfortable home to move into a convent and become a midwife in London’s East End slums. While delivering babies all over the city, Jenny encounters a colorful cast of women—from the plucky, warm-hearted nuns with whom she lives, to the woman with twenty-four children who can’t speak English, to the prostitutes of the city’s seedier side. An unfortgettable story of motherhood, the bravery of a community, and the strength of remarkable and inspiring women, Call the Midwife is the true story behind the beloved PBS series, which will soon return for its sixth season.

Kim’s Review:

I love this book! This time through was my fourth-time reading Call the Midwife. This was another of Audible’s Daily Deals and I am so glad that I got it! And specific to the audiobook, the narrator, Nicola Barber is fantastic! She has one of those voices that draws you in and is a pleasure to listen to. As for the story, Jennifer gives such amazing insight into a world that doesn’t exist anymore. And, of course, as a historian, I am all over that! Not even distant history, the East End of London in the 1950s was a fascinating place. It honestly reminds me of the rural, Southern US towns where every knows everyone else and everyone talks to everyone and you can’t walk down the street without saying hello to everyone in town. The comradery is something that our present world desperately needs and if we had it, there would be far fewer problems.

If I had the Sisters of St. Raymond Nonnatus Midwives and District Nurses in my community, then I would plan of having all my kids at home and never set foot in a hospital. But I’ve decided not to have kids because it sound horrible! Especially in this book! There are detailed accounts of childbirth in all kind of conditions and frankly, it all sounds nasty so no thank you! But, back to the sisters, they sound like such wonderful people. I am genuinely sad that I never got to meet Sister Monica Joan or Sister Julienne. Sister Monica Joan is one of those people that makes life interesting. One minute you’re angry with her for being so crotchety, the next you’re laughing at her naughty antics, the next you’re feeling sorry for her senility and frailty.

One thing that surprised me about the sisters is their flexibility. Jennifer often talks about the strictness of hospital staff with the nurses contrasted with the sisters and their sense of understanding and fun. You don’t really expect that with nuns and it was a pleasant, refreshing surprise. By the time I was finished, I felt like I actually knew the people written about in this book. I have an understanding of the Cockney people that I didn’t before. I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. This is another book I bought for my mother-in-law over a year ago and she still talks about! I believe that anyone who enjoys a good story, fun characters, hilarious situations, detailed medical issues, or history would love reading Call the Midwife.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

 

 

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