Cover Reveal: The Picture by Roger Bray @rararesources @rogerbray22

Today I am helping in the cover reveal for The Picture by Roger Bray. This is a gorgeous cover and I can’t wait to share it with you!

A warehouse in Japan used as an emergency shelter in the aftermath of the 2011 Tsunami.
A distraught, young Japanese woman in dishevelled clothes sits on a box, holding her infant daughter.

Ben, a US rescue volunteer, kneels in front of her offering comfort. They hug, the baby between them. The moment turns into an hour as the woman sobs into his shoulder; mourning the loss of her husband, her home, the life she knew. A picture is taken, capturing the moment. It becomes a symbol; of help freely given and of the hope of the survivors. The faces in the picture cannot be recognised, and that is how Ben likes it. No celebrity, thanks not required.

But others believe that being identified as the person in the picture is their path to fame and fortune. Ben stands, unknowingly, in their way, but nothing a contract killing cannot fix.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does the cover look like?????? Keep scrolling to find out!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Almost there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here it is!

 

About the Author:

I have always loved writing; putting words onto a page and bringing characters to life. I can almost feel myself becoming immersed into their lives, living with their fears and triumphs. Thus, my writing process becomes an endless series of questions. What would she or he do, how would they react, is this in keeping with their character? Strange as it sounds, I don’t like leaving characters in cliffhanging situations without giving them an ending, whichever way it develops.
My life to date is what compels me to seek a just outcome, the good will overcome and the bad will be punished. More though, I tend to see my characters as everyday people in extraordinary circumstances, but in which we may all find our selves if the planets align wrongly or for whatever reason you might consider.

Of course, most novels are autobiographical in some way. You must draw on your own experiences of life and from events you have experienced to get the inspiration. My life has been an endless adventure. Serving in the Navy, fighting in wars, serving as a Police officer and the experiences each one of those have brought have all drawn me to this point, but it was a downside to my police service that was the catalyst for my writing.

Medically retired after being seriously injured while protecting a woman in a domestic violence situation I then experienced the other side of life. Depression and rejection. Giving truth to the oft said saying that when one door closes another opens I pulled myself up and enrolled in college gaining bachelor and master degrees, for my own development rather than any professional need. The process of learning, of getting words down onto the page again relit my passion for writing in a way that I hadn’t felt since high school.

So here we are, two books published and another on track.

Where it will take me I have no idea but I am going to enjoy getting there and if my writing can bring some small pleasure into people’s lives along the way, then I consider that I will have succeeded in life.

Contact Roger:
Website
Facebook
Twitter @rogerbray22

Once available for pre-order, you can buy The Picture here:
Smashwords
Amazon 

 

 

 

Blog Tour: Game Show @rararesources

Today I am one of the stops on the blog tour for Game Show by Allie Cresswell. I will be interviewing her!

Book Description:

It is 1992, and in a Bosnian town a small family cowers in their basement. The Serbian militia is coming – an assorted rabble of malcontents given authority by a uniform and inflamed by the idea that they’re owed something, big-time, and the Bosnians are going to pay. When they get to the town they will ransack the houses, round up the men and rape the women. Who’s to stop them? Who’s to accuse them? Who will be left, to tell the tale?

Meanwhile, in a nondescript northern UK town a group of contestants make their way to the TV studios to take part in a radical new Game Show. There’s money to be won, and fun to be had. They’ll be able to throw off their inhibitions and do what they want because they’ll all be in disguise and no-one will ever know.

In a disturbing denouement, war and game meld into each other as action and consequence are divided, the words ‘blame’ and ‘fault’ have no meaning and impunity reigns .

Game Show asks whether the situation which fostered the Bosnian war, the genocide in Rwanda, the rise of so-called Islamic State in Syria and the ethnic cleansing in Myanmar could ever happen in the West. The answer will shock you.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK


JRR (Jessica’s Reading Room) Tell us a little about yourself.

I am a mum and a granny, with two grown up children, two granddaughters, two grandsons, two cockapoos but just one husband, Tim. We live in beautiful Cumbria. Apart from writing and reading I enjoy cooking and gardening. I also knit and crochet.

JRR: You have a big family!  Did you always want to become an author?

Yes, I think so. When I was about eight I asked for a stack of writing paper for Christmas so that I could write stories down. Later I appropriated my mum’s Remmington typewriter and taught myself to use it so that people could actually read what I had written although this backfired on me. The first story I shared was met with gales of laughter from my family – it wasn’t meant to be funny. After that I went underground with my writing and was reluctant to share anything.

I deviated slightly in my later teens, thinking I would like to be an actor – which is really the same thing – just bringing stories to life in a different way. I went to Birmingham University to study English and Drama but soon found the acting part of the course too intimidating and the ‘lovies’ likewise. I stuck it out, doing lots of behind the scenes jobs. But the English element of the course really inspired me. I read lots. I began to understand the way story, character, language and theme work together. After Birmingham I went to Queen Mary College to do an MA, specialising in the novel as form, and studying Henry James who, to me, is the master of novel writing.

JRR: Who was the most influential author you read when you were growing up?  Did his/her writings influence you to want to become an author?

As a child I read voraciously, encouraged by my lovely mum. I loved Noel Streatfield, Malcolm Savile, LM Montgomery and Francis Hodgson Burnet. I still have their dog-eared paperbacks on my shelves today. If I had to pick one it would be Noel Streatfield. Her books swept me away; I loved her strong, determined heroines who followed their dreams. For a quiet, unremarkable little girl like me they were such an inspiration. I had dreams and ambitions too. Maybe, just maybe I could achieve mine.

JRR:  Who is your favorite author as an adult? Who inspires you?

That is a really tricky question. I couldn’t possibly pick just one! I adore all the nineteenth century greats – Dickens, Trollope, the Brontes, Wharton – as well as Jane Austen. But these days I have discovered some other fantastic writers who tell compelling stories and use great language – this, to me, is the hallmark of good writing. Recently I discovered an American writer called Laurel Savile – her writing is sublime. Elizabeth Strout has an ability to describe atmosphere, intonation and sub-text which is almost extra-sensory. Patrick Gale tells such poignant stories, and he tells them so well. All these writers inspire me.

JRR: I know, you can’t just pick one!  😉  What inspires you to write?  What inspires you to write the books that you do write?

I am an inveterate nosey parker and listener-in to other people’s business. I pick up bits of conversations in shops and cafes, I see things – an incident in the street, say – and wonder, ‘What’s happening there? What caused it? What will happen next?’ Before I know it I am creating character and inventing dialogue – and a story is born.

There have been aspects of my own life which have inspired some of my books. I worked through a lot of personal issues in the Lost Boys quartet, for example.

I don’t write genre. Each of my books is different. They were all inspired by a certain individual situation or idea and I wrote them to explore the causalities, the sub-text and the psychology. I wrote them to provide outcomes which I could never know in real life. That’s the problem with people-watching, they leave the café and you never do know how things turn out for them. But, when I write, I can provide an ending, which is always satisfying.

JRR:  What does your writing process consist of?  ( Do you research, do you hand write or type, do you listen to music or need silence?)

Firstly, the idea. It must excite me. I will find myself thinking about it while I’m hoovering or walking the dogs. Then, the most difficult thing of all. Beginning. Opening a new document and getting the first few paragraphs down. Then, seeing my way. I never know the end from the beginning. It unfurls before me. Sometimes it unfurls wrong, and I have to retrace. I research as I go: did people have mobile ‘phones in 1992? What was women’s underwear like in 1945? How long would it take to drive from Middlesborough to Manchester?

My writing day starts at about ten. I have a room which is set aside for writing where I can be quiet and relatively undisturbed. I can’t stand any kind of background noise at all, so no music. Usually I re-read whatever I wrote the day before, tweaking and amending, adding, subtracting.

Then I write until about 3.30 or 4. I stop, read over, save and walk away.

JRR:  Where did the idea for Game Show come from?  What made you decide to include reality television with 1992 and the Bosnian/Serbian war?

Game Show developed following an experience as a member of a real TV game show audience. It was in 1992. News about the Bosnian War was just filtering through to us. I had two small children at the time. It was so harrowing, watching the news, seeing families trudging across the countryside or those poor boys and men starving and abused and traumatised in the concentration camps. Nowadays, unfortunately it is all too common – Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Myanmar. But then, it was new and shocking. As I sat in the audience and watched people cheat and lie and pretend – all for the sake of what wasn’t, even in those days, a really amazing prize – the stark contrast between the two situations really hit me. The one so tragic and desperate, the other so superficial and phoney.

The similarities of the two didn’t hit me until I was well in to writing the book and I got to understand the situation in Bosnia better. It took me ten years to write Game Show partly because the history of the war didn’t really emerge until then. Also, I came across Dr. Philip Zimbardo’s book The Lucifer Effect which really explained situational psychology to me. I had been groping towards an understanding of it feeling that my original premise – that people are fundamentally evil – wasn’t right, but not knowing what was. Situational psychology explains both the psychology of the Bosnian War (and of many other conflicts, political scandals and celebrity outrages since) as well as the way ‘reality’ TV can provoke people into acting out of character.

JRR:  Wow! Thank you for that insight, that makes you think.  Now are you a reality tv fan?  How ‘real’ can reality tv be?

No. I find it specious and embarrassing now that I understand what’s going on. I think of the participants as victims. Of course, as in Game Show, it is possible for people to reject the total situation which is trying to herd them into mob mentality, and become heroes, like Barry in Game Show. But, sadly, these incidences are rare.

JRR:  If you could have dinner with three people (living or dead) who would they be and why?

Perhaps this is too personal but I would give my right arm and my left one too to spend an evening with my mum and dad – to tell them all the things I never got round to saying and to show them their great grandchildren. They would be so proud.

I would love to meet my step-daughter, who doesn’t speak to us, to understand her feelings and to get to know her a little.

If you feel that it isn’t appropriate to mention these things, I would choose Stephen Fry, who would be an interesting and amusing dinner date, Henry James, who would give me some tips on novel writing, and Stephen Spielberg, who might agree to make Game Show into a film.

JRR:  Your answers are not too personal at all! That’s why I like to ask that question! I like to get to know authors personally.  Which book have you always meant to get around to reading, but still not read?

I have read almost all of Dickens but I have never read The Pickwick Papers. I have tried numerous times, but just not been able to get in to it.

JRR: What’s the best advice you have ever received?

Go confidently in the direction of your dreams.

JRR:  Is there anything else you would like to share?

Game Show is set in 1992 – 26 years ago. But what is so interesting about its premise is that it explains so much that is happening today. The Harvey Weinstein affair, the Oxfam Haiti prostitute scandal, the organised grooming of children for sexual exploitation, even the attempted murder of Sergei Skripal and his daughter – all these occur when people feel they are given permission to act as they wouldn’t ordinarily do, told that there will be no consequences or feel that it’s OK, because everyone else is doing it.

JRR:  Thank you so much for your time with this interview Allie!


About the Author:

I have been writing stories since I could hold a pencil and by the time I was in Junior School I was writing copiously and sometimes almost legibly.

I did, however, manage a BA in English and Drama from Birmingham University and an MA in English from Queen Mary College, London. Marriage and motherhood put my writing career on hold for some years until 1992 when I began work on Game Show.

In the meantime I worked as a production manager for an educational publishing company, an educational resources copywriter, a bookkeeper for a small printing firm, and was the landlady of a country pub in Yorkshire, a small guest house in Cheshire and the proprietor of a group of boutique holiday cottages in Cumbria. Most recently I taught English Literature to Lifelong learners.

Nowadays I write as full time as three grandchildren, a husband, two Cockapoos and a large garden will permit.

Contact Allie:
Website
Facebook

Look out for the rest of the blog tour!

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First Line Friday #65

Today’s First Line Friday was released earlier this year. Though it was not for me, it has a doozy of a first line!

I remember the gunshots made a wet sort of sound, phssh phssh phssh, and each time he hit her she screamed.

The year is 1982; the setting, an Edenic hamlet some ninety miles north of New York City. There, among the craggy rock cliffs and glacial ponds of timeworn mountains, three friends—Patrick, Matthew, and Hannah—are bound together by a terrible and seemingly senseless crime. Twenty-six years later, in New York City, living lives their younger selves never could have predicted, the three meet again—with even more devastating results.

Here is a triple helix of a story structure, a sharp-edged love triangle complete with an Atonement style revelation. Character-driven, gorgeously written and wrenching, it exposes the poisonous resentments, sexual longings, and reservoirs of violence that roil just below the orderly surface of small town life.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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