Tag: 2.5 Stars

Tattletale

Author: Sarah J Naughton
336 pages in Kindle

Published: March 23, 2017
Dates Read: March 13-31, 2017

My Rating: 2.5 stars

Book Summary from Goodreads:

For fans of Disclaimer and I Let You Go, Tattletale is the debut psychological thriller you can’t miss.

Once upon a time, there was a little girl who believed in fairytales. Now she is out to get your happy ending.

One day changes Jody’s life forever.
She has shut herself down, haunted by her memories and unable to trust anyone. But then she meets Abe, the perfect stranger next door and suddenly life seems full of possibility and hope.

One day changes Mags’ life forever.
After years of estrangement from her family, Mags receives a shocking phone call. Her brother Abe is in hospital and no-one knows what happened to him. She meets his fiancé Jody, and gradually pieces together the ruins of the life she left behind.

But the pieces don’t quite seem to fit…

My Review:

As I started Tattletale, I was pulled into it from the beginning. There is some confusion as it just takes off without explanation as to what is happening, but you figure it out as you continue reading. Once you realize who the main cast of characters is, Tattletale gets easier to follow.

The characters that you need to know are:
Abe- in the hospital
Jody- Abe’s fiancé
Mags- Abe’s sister
Mira- Abe and Jody’s neighbor

I wanted to like Tattletale. The description intrigued me but the novel just wasn’t for me. Tattletale has multiple points of view, which I enjoy and those come from Mags, Jody and Mira. Also in the chapters are flashbacks of Abe, Mags, and Jody’s lives, which are relevant to the story.

***Be warned that there are graphic scenes of child abuse and also sexual assault in this novel.

I think novels with unreliable narrators may not be for me. I have had some that I have enjoyed and others not so much. You have no idea whose side to believe in Tattletale, which I applaud Sarah J Naughton for. I sadly found myself not attached to any of the characters. Mags was not likeable at all for me, I did begin to feel some sympathy for Jody as the novel progressed, I wanted to know more about Mira and her life, but the one character I would have loved to hear about and get to know was Abe, whom unfortunately we are unable to do.

I struggled around the halfway mark but continued, but then I almost gave up with Tattletale at 82%. What kept me going was the curiosity as to what exactly happened to Abe. It was good that I decided to continue as when I reach 85% then the novel went somewhere for me. From this point on I didn’t want to put Tattletale down. It goes in a direction that I did not see coming and I had no idea what was going to happen. Things do get unbelievable and unrealistic towards the end. I can’t really say why without revealing some spoilers.

Even though Tattletale was not for me I would be willing to read another of Sarah J Naughton’s books in the future.

Thank you to NetGalley and TBConFB for my copy.

The Husband

16429
Author: Dean Koontz
Audiobook

Published: May 30, 2006
Dates Read: September 12-22, 2016

My Rating: 2.5 Stars

Book Summary from Amazon:

What would you do for love? Would you die? Would you kill?

We have your wife. You can get her back for two million cash. Landscaper Mitchell Rafferty thinks it must be some kind of joke. He was in the middle of planting impatiens in the yard of one of his clients when his cell phone rang. Now he’s standing in a normal suburban neighborhood on a bright summer day, having a phone conversation out of his darkest nightmare.

Whoever is on the other end of the line is dead serious. He has Mitch’s wife and he’s named the price for her safe return. The caller doesn’t care that Mitch runs a small two-man landscaping operation and has no way of raising such a vast sum. He’s confident that Mitch will find a way.

If he loves his wife enough. . . Mitch does love her enough. He loves her more than life itself. He’s got seventy-two hours to prove it. He has to find the two million by then. But he’ll pay a lot more. He’ll pay anything.

From its tense opening to its shattering climax, The Husband is a thriller that will hold you in its relentless grip for every twist, every shock, every revelation…until it lets you go, unmistakably changed. This is a Dean Koontz novel, after all. And there’s no other experience quite like it.


My Review:

The premise of the book catches your attention and pulls you in. The actual novel not so much.

The Husband is divided into three parts. The first part is very good. Mitchell (Mitch) Rafferty is a landscaper and working a job when he receives a call that his wife has been kidnapped. And the kidnappers want $2 Million cash. He has 60 hours to get the money and they know he is a gardener with limited means. They let him know they are serious by shooting a man walking a dog. And like other novels similar to this, no cops or they kill his wife.

Here starts Mitch’s journey to rush to get the money. Will he make it to the deadline? Will he get the money? Will he save his wife? What will happen?

The book’s direction falls flat. There is a twist that you find out early on who is responsible for this happening.

There are several subplots, one involves his family and his childhood. This includes a sense-deprivation room that his parents used on Mitch and his siblings growing up. You do get to see how experiencing that affects them in both extremes, good and bad. This could be a fabulous plot to be used… in another book.

Overall, I could not recommend this book. I did keep listening to it to see what would happen. When I finished it I did not really have an opinion of the book. This was disappointing as I was hoping it would keep me on the edge of my seat and have me wanting more.

This is my second Koontz book, the first was Life Expectancy which I had rated four stars. Despite being disappointed in The Husband, I will read Koontz again.

[Top]

The Middle Place

1779929

Author: Kelly Corrigan
269 pages in Paperback

Published: December 23, 2008
Dates Read: August 30- September 7, 2016

My Rating: 2.5 Stars

Book Summary from Amazon:

For Kelly Corrigan, family is everything. At thirty-six, she had a marriage that worked, two funny, active kids, and a weekly newspaper column. But even as a thriving adult, Kelly still saw herself as the daughter of garrulous Irish-American charmer George Corrigan. She was living deep within what she calls the Middle Place–“that sliver of time when parenthood and childhood overlap”–comfortably wedged between her adult duties and her parents’ care. But Kelly is abruptly shoved into coming-of-age when she finds a lump in her breast–and gets the diagnosis no one wants to hear. When George, too, learns that he has late-stage cancer, it is Kelly’s turn to take care of the man who had always taken care of her–and to show us a woman who finally takes the leap and grows up.

Kelly Corrigan is a natural-born storyteller, a gift you quickly recognize as her father’s legacy, and her stories are rich with everyday details. She captures the beat of an ordinary life and the tender, sometimes fractious moments that bind families together. Rueful and honest, Kelly is the prized friend who will tell you her darkest, lowest, screwiest thoughts, and then later dance on the coffee table at your party.

Funny yet heart-wrenching, The Middle Place is about being a parent and a child at the same time. It is about the special double-vision you get when you are standing with one foot in each place. It is about the family you make and the family you came from–and locating, navigating, and finally celebrating the place where they meet. It is about reaching for life with both hands–and finding it.

My Review:

Kelly Corrigan’s title of her memoir is The Middle Place; which is where she feels she is in life when this journey began. She is in that time between being someone’s child and being someone’s parent. I am the age Kelly is when she discovers the lump in her breast that ends up being cancer.

From the description of the novel, I expected to read more on her journey of going through the cancer treatments. Yes we do get some of that, but then her father gets his third occurrence of cancer and the book becomes more about her being concerned about losing her father. That may have been her coping mechanism to get through her cancer. But being her age, I wanted more of her story. Yes, this is her story to tell in her way, but it seems I wanted a different book than what I got.

In some ways she also became unlikeable. Again, this was most likely her coping mechanism. In one point of the novel she is angry with her husband for “talking to his parents too much” according to her:

“I’m glad you’re bringing your cell. If you get bored, you can call your parents again.” (Page 236)
“It bugs me that you’re always calling your parents,” (Page 237)

Then a couple of pages later, she is calling her parents to check on her dad and her girls. At one point her dad says:

“Lovey! I better let you go! You can’t spend your vacation on the phone with us!” (Page 240)

Isn’t this what you just got upset with your husband about?

Some reviewers have issues with the language she uses. Again, this is her story to tell in the way she will tell it. There was also no big revelation at the end. She didn’t discover faith as some would have liked. This is a memoir and sometimes we don’t get what we want as we do with with fiction books.

Overall, I can’t recommend this book. It just wasn’t for me.

[Top]