Tag: 3 stars

The Daughter’s Tale

Author: Armando Lucas Correa
Published: May 7, 2019
320 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

BERLIN, 1939: The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their beloved family bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward the south of France, where the widow of an old friend of her husband’s has agreed to take her in. Along the way, a refugee ship headed for Cuba offers another chance at escape and there, at the dock, Amanda is forced to make an impossible choice that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Once in Haute-Vienne, her brief respite is inter­rupted by the arrival of Nazi forces, and Amanda finds herself in a labor camp where she must once again make a heroic sacrifice.

NEW YORK, 2015: Eighty-year-old Elise Duval receives a call from a woman bearing messages from a time and country that she forced herself to forget. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise is shocked to discover that the letters were from her mother, written in German during the war. Despite Elise’s best efforts to stave off her past, seven decades of secrets begin to unravel.

Kim’s Review:

I’m so sad about this book. I wanted to love it and I’d been looking forward to reading it for quite a while. I know that reviewing WWII/Holocaust books can be tricky, especially when the review isn’t completely positive. The premise for this book held so much potential. The characters also had great range of emotions and I easily sympathized with them. However, the main thing that didn’t work, and I hope no one misinterprets what I’m saying, is that everyone was so melodramatic.

Some books don’t convey the horrors of war or of the Holocaust and I try to call them out on it. But this book almost had a parallel, yet still opposite effect. It wasn’t like reading a history book, it was like watching a soap opera version of WWII/Holocaust stories. I tried to see the emotions underneath everything, but if the writing had its nose up in the air any higher, it would have drowned when it rained. I sincerely doubt that those who were arrested by the Nazis spent so much time poetically identifying their feelings. It all just felt so over the top, in a not good way at all.

Plus, I felt like a whole half of the story wasn’t being told. I wanted to hear about Viera’s life in Cuba. Everyone else got to be so emotional, why didn’t she? I wanted so badly to love this story and the characters, it just all fell flat. However, I will say that it did hold my attention, and for such lofty writing, it was very easy to read. Overall, this is not my favorite WWII/Holocaust literature, but I don’t want to write it off completely. It was by no means a bad book, it just isn’t for me.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

The Way: Age of Darkness

Author: Cole Alexander Higgins
Published: August 13, 2019
170 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

“Inside every world is another world, and inside of that is darkness and light.”

There exists a subconscious realm where emotions and thought can be found in their most vulnerable and raw state. It’s through this realm of not-quite-here and not-quite-there that accomplished animator and storyteller, Cole Alexander Higgins, will guide you in his new book The Way Volume 1: Age of Darkness.

This unique story is set in a distant, primitive world. A dark, malevolent force has spread across the land, turning brothers into enemies and men into monsters. Each image represents a window into the daily lives of this time and these people. These visions reveal how the people of a once great world fell into darkness, and what might be required for them to climb their way back to the light.

The Way Volume 1: Age of Darkness insightful story and striking imagery act as gateways to the subconscious—the area where our truest selves reside. Explore the depths of your own subconscious and the struggle between darkness and light. And perhaps discover your own path along the way.

Immerse yourself in The Way Volume 1: Age of Darkness and get ready to discover the worlds found within worlds…

Kim’s Review:

I was given a copy of The Way: Age of Darkness from Archangel Ink in exchange for an honest review. I was intrigued by the book the minute I picked it up, the cover and illustrations looked interesting. I will admit that I doubt I’m the best person to review this book simply because I’m not all that deep. There’s a lot implied and each person’s own self will greatly influence each individual reading. That sounds so hippie, but it’s true. Each page is literally one word and illustration. There was enough there to keep me interested in trying to form a story in my head.

As I said before, I’m not the most philosophically deep person, so I doubt I got what I was meant to. However, I enjoyed reading it for what it was and I would probably pick up Volume 2 when it’s released. Overall, a fascinating read.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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Enchantée by Gita Trelease

Author: Gita Trelease
Published: February 5, 2019
449 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

Paris in 1789 is a labyrinth of twisted streets, filled with beggars, thieves, revolutionaries—and magicians…

When smallpox kills her parents, Camille Durbonne must find a way to provide for her frail, naive sister while managing her volatile brother. Relying on petty magic—la magie ordinaire—Camille painstakingly transforms scraps of metal into money to buy the food and medicine they need. But when the coins won’t hold their shape and her brother disappears with the family’s savings, Camille must pursue a richer, more dangerous mark: the glittering court of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

With dark magic forbidden by her mother, Camille transforms herself into the ‘Baroness de la Fontaine’ and is swept up into life at the Palace of Versailles, where aristocrats both fear and hunger for la magie. There, she gambles at cards, desperate to have enough to keep herself and her sister safe. Yet the longer she stays at court, the more difficult it becomes to reconcile her resentment of the nobles with the enchantments of Versailles. And when she returns to Paris, Camille meets a handsome young balloonist—who dares her to hope that love and liberty may both be possible.

But la magie has its costs. And when Camille loses control of her secrets, the game she’s playing turns deadly. Then revolution erupts, and she must choose—love or loyalty, democracy or aristocracy, freedom or magic—before Paris burns…

Kim’s Review:

First off, let’s all take a moment to admire this cover! It makes my skin tingle!!! Definitely in my Top 5 fave covers of the year! I predict it goes pretty far in Series two at the end of the year for our Most Gorgeous Cover competition! Unfortunately, the cover is far better than the story. It has its good elements, but overall, I wasn’t impressed with the story. I’ve said before that I like more condensed scope that feels more intimate and manageable. However, if the situation calls for it, a wider scope works and works well. This book felt like it should have been far wider in scope than it was. For Camille, it never seemed to get farther than getting money so they can survive. I get it, that’s obviously a good goal, but in the middle of the French Revolution? I expected more to happen. She talked a good game about wanting equality and down with the nobles and all that, but she never DID anything. When you look at the story as a whole, it’s literally a tiff between teen nobles . . . And that’s pretty much it.

Yes, there was magic, but you never learn anything about it. The characters, while mostly likable, felt very static. I found myself pulling for the bad guy and looking for a twist that never happened. Most of the facets of the story felt like they didn’t fit in with each other. The balloon didn’t really fit with the revolution, the magic didn’t really fit with Versailles, the villain’s motivation seemed so shallow and flat compared to the times. I’m glad I read it, and I liked hearing about the fashion and life at Versailles, but I don’t think I’ll ever read it again. I also wouldn’t really recommend it to too many people. Maybe readers with a deeper imagination than I have would like it better. 

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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