Tag: 3 stars

Book Review: The Dragon’s Bride by Katee Robert

The Dragon’s Bride
Series: A Deal with a Demon #1

Author: Katee Robert
Published: March 29, 2022
186 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

Briar Rose might have a name out of a storybook, but she learned at a very young age that no prince was coming to save her. She’ll have to save herself. Unfortunately, even that is an impossible task in her current situation—trapped in a terrifying marriage to a dangerous man.

Desperate times call for desperate measures, which is how she finds herself making a deal with a demon. Freedom from her husband…in return for seven years of service.

She expects the service to be backbreaking and harsh. She doesn’t expect to be put on an auction block in a room full of literal monsters and sold to the highest bidder.

To Sol.
A dragon.

He might seem kinder than his fearsome looks imply, but she knows better than to trust the way he wants to take care of her, or how invested he is in her pleasure. In her experience, if something seems too good to be true, it certainly is.

Falling for Sol is out of the question. She’s suffered enough, and she has no intention of staying in this realm…even if she leaves her heart behind when she returns to her normal life.

Kim’s Review:

Another buddy read with Beccie! And unfortunately, not nearly as good as the Prime Mating Agency. I get suspension of disbelief and all, but c’mon. I don’t think any of the mechanics actually worked in this book. A dragon with 2 huge dingdongs and a maw filled with fangs and a forked tongue and a petite human female. It was just too much of a leap for me. Plus, both human and dragon were morons. Apparently they were incapable of working their way out of a problematic wet paper bag! They didn’t use their brains until like the last chapter and by then, they were already given the solution by someone else. I’m giving it 3 stars because it held my attention, but I didn’t really like this book.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

ARC Review: The Latecomer by Jean Hanff Korelitz

The Latecomer
Author: Jean Hanff Korelitz

To Be Published:  May 31, 2022
448 Pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Dates Read: April 20- May 8, 2022
Jessica’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

The Latecomer follows the story of the wealthy, New York City-based Oppenheimer family, from the first meeting of parents Salo and Johanna, under tragic circumstances, to their triplets born during the early days of IVF. As children, the three siblings – Harrison, Lewyn, and Sally – feel no strong familial bond and cannot wait to go their separate ways, even as their father becomes more distanced and their mother more desperate. When the triplets leave for college, Johanna, faced with being truly alone, makes the decision to have a fourth child. What role will the “latecomer” play in this fractured family?

A complex novel that builds slowly and deliberately, The Latecomer touches on the topics of grief and guilt, generational trauma, privilege and race, traditions and religion, and family dynamics. It is a profound and witty family story from an accomplished author, known for the depth of her character studies, expertly woven storylines, and plot twists.

Jessica’s Review: 

The Latecomer is a difficult novel to review. When I received it I saw how the tome that it is at nearly 450 pages and small font, I already knew I had a challenge ahead of me.  The premise sounded interesting for me with triplets first and then a later in life fourth child, but the delivery was also difficult to read.  We have Sal and Johanna who meet after an accident and eventually get married and have early stages IVF children.

But these children do not share a bond that you would expect with triplets, or even a shared bond as siblings at all.  These triplets (Harrison, Sally, and Lewyn) do not like each other and can’t wait to get away from them and their parents.  Due to the lack of familial bonds, when the triplets are seventeen Johanna decides to have the fourth embryo implanted into a surrogate. 

None of these characters are likeable, with Harrison being the least liked by me as a reader. I skimmed over Harrison’s chapters; I was not interested in him at all.  I was intrigued more with Sally and Lewyn with their situation of being at the same college, but not acknowledging each other at all. Of course, this situation heads to disaster. 

If you can make it through the first 300/350-ish pages, then when Phoebe (the fourth child) makes an appearance then you are in for a ride as she changes everything up when she becomes seventeen.  There is a bit of a surprise in these last pages where nothing is as you think!

This is a novel that focuses on family dysfunction, high art society, privilege, race, and secrets galore. The Oppenheimer family are Jewish, so for those not familiar with the Jewish religion and traditions, you will learn some.  The Latecomer is a slow burn that if you can make it through until Phoebe takes off then you are set!

Many thanks to the publisher for granting me a copy via Bookish First.

Pre-Order Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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Novella Review: Prosper’s Demon by K.J. Parker

Prosper’s Demon
Series: Prospero’s Demon #1
Author: K.J. Parker
Published: January 28, 2020
112 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

In a botched demonic extraction, they say the demon feels it ten times worse than the man. But they don’t die, and we do. Equilibrium.

The unnamed and morally questionable narrator is an exorcist with great follow-through and few doubts. His methods aren’t delicate but they’re undeniably effective: he’ll get the demon out — he just doesn’t particularly care what happens to the person.

Prosper of Schanz is a man of science, determined to raise the world’s first philosopher-king, reared according to the purest principles. Too bad he’s demonically possessed.

Kim’s Review:

This was an odd one. Once again, I felt like I was thrown into a story right in the middle and not told anything about what’s going on. I’d really like another book all about the history of these “exorcists” and why the demons do what they do, etc. But once I kinda, sorta had a sense of what was going on, the story was relatively clear. This book was definitely more character development driven as opposed to plot. It’s a simple story that got a little mired in complicated writing. It wasn’t the easiest book to read, but it’s also short. The overarching message of the book is actually easy to understand and appreciate, it just felt like a lot of work to get there. Overall, I’m glad I read it and I adore the cover!!!!!

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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