Tag: fiction

Still Me

Author: Jojo Moyes
Published: January 30, 2018
Audiobook

Reviewed By: Jessica
Dates Read: March 6- April 1, 2018
Jessica’s Rating: 3.5 stars

Book Description:

Louisa Clark arrives in New York ready to start a new life, confident that she can embrace this new adventure and keep her relationship with Ambulance Sam alive across several thousand miles. She steps into the world of the superrich, working for Leonard Gopnik and his much younger second wife, Agnes. Lou is determined to get the most out of the experience and throws herself into her new job and New York life.

As she begins to mix in New York high society, Lou meets Joshua Ryan, a man who brings with him a whisper of her past. Before long, Lou finds herself torn between Fifth Avenue where she works and the treasure-filled vintage clothing store where she actually feels at home. And when matters come to a head, she has to ask herself: Who is Louisa Clark? And how do you reconcile a heart that lives in two places?

Funny, romantic, and poignant, Still Me follows Lou as she navigates how to stay true to herself, while pushing to live boldly in her brave new world.

Jessica’s Review:

Still Me is the third in the series about Louisa Clark (Lou). The first novel, Me BeforeYou is the best, though for me it was not a love story, it was an end of life story. Lou is the focus, but for me the story was all about Will. Yes, I did the ugly cry, and no, I have not brought myself to watch the movie. I don’t think I can handle it. In After You Lou is trying to move on in her life past Will. She learns something about Will and she also meets Ambulance Sam. At the end she is moving on to New York City.

My reviews are here:
Me Before You
After You

Now we have Still Me. I like Lou: She is just a normal young lady who had some intriguing circumstances in her life and now we get to see more of that life. She is now in New York with a new job! She works and adjusts to a different sort of life until things happen. I couldn’t help but feel for Lou at certain times, she was being naïve and innocent in some ways. At some times I couldn’t help but roll my eyes at her as well.  I felt like at times that she is dragging herself into things that she shouldn’t.  And then I felt at times, “Come on, move on from Will!”  She gets into a bit of a mess and has to figure out what she will do next.

There are also romantic entanglements and at times I wanted to help smack some sense into her. It was frustration in a good way since Lou is a lady you can’t help but like and you want her to have her happy ending, whatever that may be. By the end Lou has made her decision and Moyes ends the story, but I could see it continuing if she chooses to. Lou is her character and yes, if she wrote a fourth novel about Lou I would read it.

Still Me is recommended.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

The House of Small Shadows


Author: Adam Nevill  
Published: July 21, 2015
384 pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

Catherine’s last job ended badly. Corporate bullying at a top TV network saw her fired and forced to leave London, but she was determined to get her life back. A new job and a few therapists later, things look much brighter. Especially when a challenging new project presents itself ― to catalogue the late M. H. Mason’s wildly eccentric cache of antique dolls and puppets. Rarest of all, she’ll get to examine his elaborate displays of posed, costumed and preserved animals, depicting bloody scenes from the Great War. Catherine can’t believe her luck when Mason’s elderly niece invites her to stay at Red House itself, where she maintains the collection until his niece exposes her to the dark message behind her uncle’s “Art.” Catherine tries to concentrate on the job, but Mason’s damaged visions begin to raise dark shadows from her own past. Shadows she’d hoped therapy had finally erased. Soon the barriers between reality, sanity and memory start to merge and some truths seem too terrible to be real… in The House of Small Shadows by Adam Nevill.

Kim’s Review:

The description and cover of this book drew me in. I’m all about some historical houses filled with all kinds of old stuff! My inner history nerd got all worked up! But unfortunately, this book was disappointing. I found Catherine to be weak and whiny. I get that people have traumatizing events in their pasts that can cause some problems later in life, but come on. I didn’t get the sense that her problems matched her past “trauma.” Her friend was taken, but she wasn’t, so . . . that doesn’t seem like as big of a problem as she’s making it. The bullying makes a little more sense, but I’ve been laughed at on the playground, I know many people who were abused by their parents and families and we’ve all come out without letting all that shut our lives down completely.

I know I’m not very sympathetic, but I just didn’t get why Catherine let her past keep her from living her life. She uses everything as an excuse for her life instead of getting over it and becoming successful. And she lost her job because she made the choice to attack a coworker, and she never seems to take responsibility for that. The story itself had so much potential, but it just never came together for me. There was no real connection between the taxidermist and the kidnapper, the puppets and the kids. I just didn’t understand all the details. There were some scary parts that had me turning all the lights in the house on, but other than that, I wasn’t really thrilled with this read. I would only recommend this book to certain people, ones who are incredibly detail oriented AND enjoy a good scare.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

[Top]

The Eye Opener: Collection of Short Stories Volume 2

The Eye Opener: Collection of Short Stories Volume 2
Author: Indrajit Garai
Published: December 8, 2017
238 pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 3 stars

Book Description:

In this collection, meet:
Franck, who has to align his desires with his needs;
Nathan, who has to adjust to his constantly changing turf;
and, Cedric, who has to open his eyes to reconstruct himself.

Kim’s Review:

The family of the author offered me this book in exchange for an honest review. Overall, the stories were pretty good. I liked the characters and I looked forward to seeing how each story unfolded. Unfortunately, the writing threw me off. It was very choppy and there were no transition points. I’d be in Cedric’s home and then BAM! next paragraph, he’d be in jail a month later. It was very distracting.

I think if each story was divided into chapters, it would solve the problem. The characters were realistic and I empathized with them easily. I also liked how each story ended on a positive note. Garai did an excellent job of showing how messy life can get, but also how mankind is capable of some good. I would recommend this to people who like emotional stories and even those who like “thinking” stories.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

[Top]