Tag: Historical Fiction

Atonement: Book Review and Movie Comparsion

Today Kim shares her review and gives a movie comparison on Atonement by Ian McEwan.

Atonement
Author: Ian McEwan
Published: 2001
351 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

On a hot summer day in 1935, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses the flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives and her precocious imagination bring about a crime that will change all their lives, a crime whose repercussions Atonement follows through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century.

Kim’s Review:

I really liked this book! McEwan managed to reach into the minds of realistic, individual people and translate it perfectly to the page. Briony as a little girl was written exactly as little girls are and think. I kept having to remind myself that none of this was written by little girls or soldiers or nurses. And to have so little happening in the first part of the book, yet I wasn’t bored with it was quite the feat. And this was one of those book where I had theories running around in my head, but of course none of them were right! The twist was actually believable and emotional. The message of the whole story is one that is definitely needed in today’s world. Plus I’m a sucker for regret dripping off the page. Overall, this was an emotional, engaging read that I would recommend to just about anybody!

Now here is Kim’s video comparison of the movie:

Purchase Links:
Novel:
Amazon US
Amazon UK
Film:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier

Jamaica Inn
Author: Daphne du Maurier
Published: 1936
307 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:

The coachman tried to warn her away from the ruined, forbidding place on the rainswept Cornish coast. But young Mary Yellan chose instead to honor her mother’s dying request that she join her frightened Aunt Patience and huge, hulking Uncle Joss Merlyn at Jamaica Inn. From her first glimpse on that raw November eve, she could sense the inn’s dark power. But never did Mary dream that she would become hopelessly ensnared in the vile, villainous schemes being hatched within its crumbling walls — or that a handsome, mysterious stranger would so incite her passions … tempting her to love a man whom she dares not trust.

Kim’s Review:

I first read this book back when I was in college. I was working on campus during the summer and I’d spend my lunches in the library reading and exploring … I know, I was a nerd. I had already read Rebecca in high school so I knew du Maurier was a great author.

Jamaica Inn is almost as good as I remember! It’s suspenseful, gothic, and kinda scary. I’ll admit that Mary felt a little overdramatic at times, which is why I gave it 4 stars, but when the problems were revealed, most of her reactions became justified. I also found it amusing that du Maurier was obsessed with gender in this book. Every other conversation was, “were I not a woman,” or “if you were a man”. Thankfully, it was mostly said in jest or “what if” scenarios, but it added an interesting perspective to a classic gothic tale. The plot also moved steadily and had a good twist, that I suspected, but was not obvious.

I’m pretty sure that Jem Merlyn was one of my first fictional crushes; he’s adorable! I enjoyed my rereading and I’d recommend this book to anyone who enjoys Jane Eyre-esque stories.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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Friant’s Video Friday: The Boy in the Striped Pajamas (Illustrated Version)

Today Kim brings you a video review of the illustrated version of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne. She previously reviewed the novel here.

The Boy in the Striped Pajamas
Author: John Boyne
Illustrator: Oliver Jeffers
Published: April 11, 2017
352 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

The international bestseller that has touched millions of readers around the world is now available in a deluxe illustrated edition, featuring powerful illustrations by acclaimed artist Oliver Jeffers.

Berlin, 1942: When Bruno returns home from school one day, he discovers that his belongings are being packed in crates. His father has received a promotion and the family must move to a new house far, far away, where there is no one to play with and nothing to do. A tall fence stretches as far as the eye can see and cuts him off from the strange people in the distance. But Bruno decides there must be more to this desolate new place than meets the eye. While exploring his new environment, he meets another boy whose life and circumstances are very different from his own, and their meeting results in a friendship that has devastating consequences.

Kim’s Video Review:

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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