Tag: horror

First Line Friday #41

Today’s First Line Friday is a suggestion from Kim. It has piqued my interest and is perfect for Halloween!  This is one I will have to get! The chapters are short and you know what that means: I won’t want to put it down!!

The first thing I notice is that my blanket is gone.

Madeline Usher has been buried alive. The doomed heroine comes to the fore in this eerie reimagining of Edgar Allan Poe’s classic short story “The Fall of the House of Usher.” Gothic, moody, and suspenseful from beginning to end, The Fall is literary horror for fans of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and Asylum.

Madeline awakes in a coffin. And she was put there by her own twin brother. But how did it come to this? In short, non-chronological chapters, Bethany Griffin masterfully spins a haunting and powerful tale of this tragic heroine and the curse on the Usher family. The house itself is alive, and it will never let Madeline escape, driving her to madness just as it has all of her ancestors. But she won’t let it have her brother, Roderick. She’ll do everything in her power to save him—and try to save herself—even if it means bringing the house down around them.

With a sinister, gothic atmosphere and relentless tension to rival Poe himself, Bethany Griffin creates a house of horrors and introduces a whole new point of view on a timeless classic. Kirkus Reviews praised it in a starred review as “A standout take on the classic haunted-house tale replete with surprises around every shadowy corner.”

Standalone Sunday: H.P. Lovecraft’s Book of Horror

Standalone Sunday was started by Megan over at Bookslayer Reads.

What is Standalone Sunday?

Each Sunday bloggers feature a standalone book (one that is not part of a series) that they loved or would recommend. The standalone can also be one you want to read. There is so much focus on books that are part of a series that standalone books seem to be forgotten. They can be just as great as book series!

Here is my selection for this week:

H.P. Lovecraft’s Book of Horror

Written by one of the most important writers of the twentieth century, Lovecraft’s 1927 essay “Supernatural Horror in Literature” traces the evolution of the genre from the early Gothic novels through to the work of contemporary American and British authors. Throughout Lovecraft acknowledges those writers and stories that are the very finest that the horror field has to offer: Edgar Allen Poe, Henry James, Rudyard Kipling, Bram Stoker, Robert Louis Stevenson, Guy de Maupassant, and Arthur Conan Doyle, among others. This chilling new collection also contains Henry James’ wonderfully atmospheric short novel The Turn of the Screw.


Here is the Wikipedia Link of H.P. Lovecraft.  This paragraph is taken from there:

Howard Phillips Lovecraft  (August 20, 1890 – March 15, 1937) was an American author who achieved posthumous fame through his influential works of horror fiction. He was virtually unknown and published only in pulp magazines before he died in poverty, but he is now regarded as one of the most significant 20th-century authors in his genre. Lovecraft was born in Providence, Rhode Island, where he spent most of his life. Among his most celebrated tales are “The Call of Cthulhu” and “The Shadow over Innsmouth“, both canonical to the Cthulhu Mythos. Lovecraft was never able to support himself from earnings as author and editor. He saw commercial success increasingly elude him in this latter period, partly because he lacked the confidence and drive to promote himself. He subsisted in progressively strained circumstances in his last years; an inheritance was completely spent by the time that he died at age 46.


This week’s selection was influenced by my husband.  He is a Lovecraft and Cthulhu fan. As hard as he tries, I can not pronounce Cthulhu to save my life!   Lovecraft still influences many today. It’s a pity he did not see fame until after his death. Have any of you read any Lovecraft?

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First Line Friday #39

I am going to try for a theme for First Line Friday for October….  Horror since we have Halloween at the end of the month!

This week’s First Line Friday deals with Vampires:

When I was a small boy I had a terrible dream. 

With Pandora, Anne Rice began a magnificent new series of vampire novels. Now, in the second of her New Tales of the Vampires, she tells the mesmerizing story of Vittorio, a vampire in the Italian Age of Gold.

Educated in the Florence of Cosimo de’ Medici, trained in knighthood at his father’s mountaintop castle, Vittorio inhabits a world of courtly splendor and country pleasures – a world suddenly threatened when his entire family is confronted by an unholy power.

In the midst of this upheaval, Vittorio is seduced by the vampire Ursula, the most beautiful of his supernatural enemies. As he sets out in pursuit of vengeance, entering the nightmarish Court of the Ruby Grail, increasingly more enchanted (and confused) by his love for the mysterious Ursula, he finds himself facing demonic adversaries, war and political intrigue.

Against a backdrop of the wonders – both sacred and profane – and the beauty and ferocity of Renaissance Italy, Anne Rice creates a passionate and tragic legend of doomed young love and lost innocence.

 

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