Tag: humor

I See Life Through Rosé-Colored Glasses


Authors: Lisa Scottoline and Francesca Serritella
To Be Published: Tomorrow, July 10, 2018
352 pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Dates Read: June 28-July 1, 2018
Jessica’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:
In I See Life Through Rosé Colored-Glasses, the bestselling mother/daughter pair is back with another hilarious and heartfelt collection of essays about the possibilities and pitfalls of everyday life.

Lisa Scottoline and Francesca Serritella’s delightful essays are sure to strike a chord with every woman. Their nine book series is among the best reviewed humor books published today, and has been compared to the late greats Erma Bombeck and Nora Ephron.

Jessica’s Review:
I See Life Through Rosé-Colored Glasses is the ninth collaboration between mother/ daughter team Lisa Scottoline and Francesca Serritella. In these collaborations they share about the hilariousness that is their everyday life. We get both hilarious perspectives of life from the ‘younger generation’ and the ‘older generation’.

Through these essays you get to know both Lisa and Francesca. If you have read all the collaborations you know them and their family very well. They come from a big Italian family and we get to see first-hand what that is like.This is the first collaboration I have read and I would love to read more! I am a big Scottoline fan, so I feel I now know her more as a person. Francesca writes a column every Sunday in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

There are lots of laughs and a little sadness in the essays they share with us. Every mother and daughter will enjoy this collection of essays. You can see Lisa and Francesca have a very special relationship: They are each other’s number one fan. Go ahead and start reading these books now, you won’t regret it! Bring this with you to the beach, it is a perfect beach read!

Thank you St Martin’s Press for granting me an arc copy via NetGalley!

Pre-Order Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

First Line Friday #48

Today’s First Line Friday is one I read many years ago when it was first published.  This was way back on November 6, 2001. I loved the cover and remember enjoying the book! It’s a quick read at just 177 pages! Then there was a very loose adaption of the book made into a film called Christmas with the Kranks in 2004 which stared Tim Allen and Jamie Lee Curtis.

The gate was packed with weary travelers, most of them standing and huddled along the walls because the meager allotment of plastic chairs had long since been taken. 

Imagine a year without Christmas. No crowded malls, no corny office parties, no fruitcakes, no unwanted presents. That’s just what Luther and Nora Krank have in mind when they decide that, just this once, they’ll skip the holiday altogether. Theirs will be the only house on Hemlock Street without a rooftop Frosty; they won’t be hosting their annual Christmas Eve bash; they aren’t even going to have a tree. They won’t need one, because come December 25 they’re setting sail on a Caribbean cruise. But, as this weary couple is about to discover, skipping Christmas brings enormous consequences–and isn’t half as easy as they’d imagined.

A classic tale for modern times, Skipping Christmas offers a hilarious look at the chaos and frenzy that have become part of our holiday tradition.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK
Buy the Film:

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Jemima J

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Jemima J: A Novel About Ugly Ducklings and Swans
Author: Jane Green
373 Pages in Paperback

Published: June 6, 2000
Dates Read: Sept 20- Oct 11, 2011

My Rating: 2 Stars

Book Summary from Amazon:

Jemima Jones is overweight. About one hundred pounds overweight. Treated like a maid by her thin and social-climbing roommates, and lorded over by the beautiful Geraldine (less talented but better paid) at the Kilburn Herald, Jemima finds that her only consolation is food. Add to this her passion for her charming, sexy, and unobtainable colleague Ben, and Jemima knows her life is in need of a serious change. When she meets Brad, an eligible California hunk, over the Internet, she has the perfect opportunity to reinvent herself–as JJ, the slim, beautiful, gym-obsessed glamour girl. But when her long-distance Romeo demands that they meet, she must conquer her food addiction to become the bone-thin model of her e-mails–no small feat.

With a fast-paced plot that never quits and a surprise ending no reader will see coming, Jemima J is the chronicle of one woman’s quest to become the woman she’s always wanted to be, learning along the way a host of lessons about attraction, addiction, the meaning of true love, and, ultimately, who she really is.


My review in 2011:

A coworker let me borrow the book. She enjoyed it. I liked the beginning and the very end. It’s the rest I have a problem with. With the author’s description of Jemima, I pictured her at over 350 pounds until the author reveals that she is about 5’7 and 217 pounds. That was a shocker! A real woman that size does not match the author’s description of the character. I also have a BIG problem with the way Jemima quickly lost the weight. It was not in a healthy way! It also seemed like a lot of the book dealt with outside appearances and not what’s on the inside, which is what actually matters.  This book is not recommended.

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