Tag: Jill Dobbe

Kids, Camels, & Cairo by Jill Dobbe

Author: Jill Dobbe
Published:  May 28, 2016
168 pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Dates Read: November 12-16, 2018
Jessica’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:

Each morning my eyes popped open the second I heard the call to prayer resound through the air. At 7:00 A.M., I walked out onto a rare quiet Cairo street and waited for the school van to pick me up. Climbing onto the van, I found a seat alongside the foreign and Muslim teachers, where I was only one of a few women not wearing hijab. It was Sunday morning, the start of another Islamic week of trying to discipline rich and apathetic students.

Traveling across the globe to work in an international school in Cairo, Egypt, was not exactly the glamorous lifestyle I thought it would be. I cherished my travels to the Red Sea, delighted in visiting the Pyramids, and appreciated the natural wonders of the Nile River. However, I also spent days without electricity or internet, was leered at by rude Egyptian men, breathed in Cairo’s cancerous black smog, and coaxed school work from students.

KIDS, CAMELS, & CAIRO is a lighthearted read about Jill Dobbe’s personal experiences as an educator abroad. Whether you’re an educator, a traveler, or just a curious reader, you will be astounded at this honest and riveting account of learning to live in an Islamic society, while confronting the frustrating challenges of being an educator in a Muslim school.

Jessica’s Review:

Jill Dobbe has written her memoir of her two years of life in Egypt while working in an international (though mainly Egyptian) school. She was there with her husband and daughter. Dobbe is from Wisconsin and that is a whole world of difference from Cairo, Egypt!  We experience the cultural and religious shocks that she experiences. 

I was looking forward to reading this memoir as I visited Egypt back in 2006. Dobbe really delivered with her descriptions of Cairo which included the dirtiness of the city and the extreme differences in the poor and wealthy.  As I was reading, I felt myself returning to Egypt myself and remembering some of the places that we both visited. We also lived through her two years of teaching, which at times was difficult for Dobbe, in particular not knowing the language. It seemed at times she was unprepared for the cultural differences of Egypt compared to the USA.  Though adjusted, it did not seem like they researched Egypt before moving there. I felt for her daughter who moved with them during her senior year of high school.  Senior year is a special time of change for a student and I feel Dobbe’s daughter missed out on some of the usual experiences that a senior faces. Granted, her daughter did get a once in a lifetime experience: a year of school in a foreign country. I just would not have picked my child’s senior year as the year to move to Cairo.

We were able to take trips with Dobbe and her family as they took vacations to various parts of Egypt that many Americans may never get to see. Dobbe describes everything very well, you really feel like you are with her while reading this novel. Dobbe also includes a few pictures of her time in Egypt which enhances the read.  Reading Kids, Camels, and Cairo had me wanting to go back to Egypt again! Reading this memoir helped me to remember my trip fondly. 

I enjoyed this memoir and look forward to reading Dobbe’s other memoirs. 

Kids, Camels, and Cairo is recommended! I received a copy of the memoir from the author. 

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Author Spotlight: Jill Dobbe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jill Dobbe is an international educator, travel writer, and published author. She writes books and articles about her experiences living and working in schools and countries around the world. The interesting sites she has seen, the unique places she traveled to, and her many experiences, good and bad, prompted her to start writing. Originally from Wisconsin, USA, she currently lives in her seventh country, Honduras, with her husband, Dan, and her Yorkie-Poo, Mickey. Jill has two adult children who also feature in many of her stories about living abroad. Ali is an international teacher who teaches in Honduras and Ian is a doctor living and working in Michigan.

While working as an elementary principal, Jill writes travel articles, reads obsessively, shops for cultural artifacts, works at scrapbooking, photographs the beautiful people and countries of Latin America, and muddles her way through the Spanish language. Jill loves her life as an international educator, and on those days when the electricity is on, the internet is working, and there is hot water, she feels she is living her dream.

Jill  is the author of two books: Here We Are & There We Go: Teaching and Traveling with Kids in Tow and Kids, Camels, and Cairo. These books are meant for adult readers and she writes a little about the school and the students, but also the places they visited.



Here We Are & There We Go
188 Pages
Book Description:

A heartwarming travel memoir filled with temper tantrums, disorienting jetlag, and zany, once-in-a-lifetime family adventures. Who says you can’t travel with kids? Dan and I find out we can do just that as we set off with our two very young kids, first to live and work on an island far out in the Pacific, then on to the continent of Africa with a few stops in between. Armed with strollers, diapers, and too much luggage, we travel to over twenty-five countries throughout a ten year span, while working together as international overseas educators. After surviving typhoon Yuri, almost being mauled by lions, and, being nearly shot by a presidential guard, we happily endure all of the good times and bad, while living life to the fullest. A decade’s worth of experiences and lifelong memories remain with us, as we return to the U.S., now with two teenagers in tow, and begin to experience our very own version of reverse culture shock.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Kids, Camels, & Cairo
174 Pages
Book Description:

Traveling across the globe to work in an international school in Cairo, Egypt, was not exactly the glamorous lifestyle I thought it would be. I cherished my travels to the Red Sea, delighted in visiting the Pyramids, and appreciated the natural wonders of the Nile River. However, I also spent days without electricity or internet, was leered at by rude Egyptian men, breathed in Cairo’s cancerous black smog, and coaxed school work from rich, apathetic students.

Why the heck did I do it?

So I could experience the unexpected, explore the extraordinary, and bask in the thrill of adventure!

Whether you’re a traveler or not, you will be astounded at this honest and riveting account of learning to live in an Islamic society, while confronting the daily challenges of being an educator in a Muslim school.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Contact Jill:
Twitter @jilldobbe
Facebook

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