Tag: fiction

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest: Book Review and Movie Comparision

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
Author: Ken Kesey
Published: 1962
325 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

Tyrannical Nurse Ratched rules her ward in an Oregon State mental hospital with a strict and unbending routine, unopposed by her patients, who remain cowed by mind-numbing medication and the threat of electric shock therapy. But her regime is disrupted by the arrival of McMurphy – the swaggering, fun-loving trickster with a devilish grin who resolves to oppose her rules on behalf of his fellow inmates. His struggle is seen through the eyes of Chief Bromden, a seemingly mute half-Indian patient who understands McMurphy’s heroic attempt to do battle with the powers that keep them imprisoned. Ken Kesey’s extraordinary first novel is an exuberant, ribald and devastatingly honest portrayal of the boundaries between sanity and madness.

Kim’s Review:

Reading this book was a given for me. I had already seen the movie; plus I learned that they had used a working psych hospital and real patients for the movie. I found this gorgeous edition of the book and started reading. What a ride! I’ll admit that there’s not tons of action and the plot itself can be a little slow going, but the emotions and thinking and discussions and strategizing all make up for it!

This is one of those stories that has to be experienced in order to be understood. I will say this, the best thing to remember is that the narrator is a chronic psych patient. As long as that’s constantly understood, the perspective, surprisingly and ironically, makes much more sense! This is a book that will stick with you and you’ll be mentally gnawing on it for a good while after you finish! I also believe that everyone working in the mental health system should read this book! It’s so good, that I actually recommend it to everyone!

Now here is Kim’s Video Comparison of the movie:

 

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

Darling Rose Gold

Darling Rose Gold
Author: Stephanie Wrobel
Published: March 17, 2020
320 Pages

Reviewed By: Jessica
Dates Read: April 4-9, 2020
Jessica’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

For the first eighteen years of her life, Rose Gold Watts believed she was seriously ill. She was allergic to everything, used a wheelchair and practically lived at the hospital. Neighbors did all they could, holding fundraisers and offering shoulders to cry on, but no matter how many doctors, tests, or surgeries, no one could figure out what was wrong with Rose Gold.

Turns out her mom, Patty Watts, was just a really good liar.

After serving five years in prison, Patty gets out with nowhere to go and begs her daughter to take her in. The entire community is shocked when Rose Gold says yes.

Patty insists all she wants is to reconcile their differences. She says she’s forgiven Rose Gold for turning her in and testifying against her. But Rose Gold knows her mother. Patty Watts always settles a score.

Unfortunately for Patty, Rose Gold is no longer her weak little darling…

And she’s waited such a long time for her mother to come home.

Jessica’s Review:

Whoa, whoa,  whoa!  I really enjoyed everything about Darling Rose Gold.  It features the complicated relationships between mothers and daughters up to the extreme with Munchausen by Proxy. Darling Rose Gold features the aftermath of Rose Gold and Patty’s situation as Patty is ending her five year prison sentence for aggravated child abuse. Patty has nowhere to go and surprisingly the now adult (at 23 years old) Rose Gold says yes to bring Patsy into her home.

What follows is dual POV’s between Patty and Rose Gold in alternating chapters.  We learn what happened to Rose Gold during Patty’s prison sentence.  As they possibly attempt to repair their relationship, it becomes a game of cat and mouse and I never knew who to believe as both are very much unreliable narrators.  

For the most part, novels that feature unreliable narrators do not work for me, but in Darling Rose Gold’s case, it worked for me 100%!  I guess it is because we have a case of crazy and crazier in this novel: Who is crazy and who is crazier? You will have to read to find out!

Neither Rose Gold nor Patty are very likeable, as the two of them together cause pure chaos!  And it all leads up to the final part of the novel and I could NOT put it down! I just HAD to know how it was going to end, and the end just left me shocked!  I did not see certain events coming. 

While you may not have the perfect relationship with your mom, you end up being thankful for it after reading Darling Rose Gold, because at least you are not Patty and Rose Gold! 

Darling Rose Gold is very highly recommended!  Many thanks to Berkley Publishing Group for granting me a copy to read and review!

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK (The book is titled as The Recovery of Rose Gold in the UK)

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Psycho: Sanitarium


Psycho: Sanitarium
Author: Chet Williamson
Published: April 12, 2016
288 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

The original Psycho novel by Robert Bloch was published in 1959 and became an instant hit, leading to the smash movie only a year later, which brought Norman Bates’s terrifying story into the public consciousness, where it still remains (proven by the success of the tv series, Bates Motel). It took Bloch 23 years to write another Psycho novel, revealing that Norman had been in a mental institution the entire time. In that sequel, Norman quickly escapes the sanitarium and goes on a killing spree in Hollywood.

But what happened in that asylum during those two decades? Until now, no one has known.

It’s 1960. Norman Bates is in the State Hospital for the Criminally Insane and it’s up to Dr. Felix Reed to bring him out of his catatonic state.

But Norman and Dr. Reed have obstacles in twisted fellow patients and staff members who think of the institution as a prison rather than a place of healing. And the greatest obstacle is the building itself, once a private sanitarium, rumored to be haunted. A wild card appears in the persona of Robert Newman, Norman’s twin brother, taken away at birth after the attending doctor pronounced him brain damaged. As Robert and Norman grow to know each other, Norman senses a darkness in Robert, even deeper than that which has lurked in Norman himself.

Soon, murders begin to occur and a shocking chain of events plunge us even deeper into the deranged madness inside the walls of Psycho: Sanitarium.

Kim’s Review:

Another mental asylum! I’m all over that! I bought this book for Ivan two Christmases ago but naturally he would rather watch horror than read it. What are ya gonna do? So I decided to read it. Worth it! I was on the hook the entire book and don’t actually figure anything out until it was spelled out for me! I can’t tell if that means these books keep getting better or I’m just getting dumber … neither would surprise me! Lol

This books shows the fascinating differences between Norman Bates and his mother. There’s also a different treatment theory given that I’d never seen before. Overall, this was a unique and intriguing read that I would recommend to any fan of Psycho! In fact, I’d recommend this book to just about any adult reader! Really good!

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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