Tag: fiction

Eternal Youth by Alexander Williams

Eternal Youth
Author: Alexander Williams
Published: December 2, 2018
346 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:

Caroline Owen is in recovery after a mental breakdown. Confined to a hostel, she has to avoid the addicts and strange, oppressive characters lurking in crannies and wandering the hallways. Getting her life back on track proves difficult as more than past ghosts are coming out of the woodwork. Bad dreams torment her of girls disappearing, girls like her, taken by some ancient evil that will do anything to stay young and beautiful. Caroline begins to learn that there are worst things than ghosts lurking in the darkness of the world. A mental patient tells her that her dreams are real, that every full moon a pair of killers take a life to replenish their youth…and are careful to take the ones who will not be missed, those that are outcast and alone.

Caroline has no choice but to confront these two monsters when she intervenes with them taking another victim and inadvertently makes herself their next target and finds that her nightmares are about to become a reality.

Kim’s Review:

This. Cover. Another cover buy for me and this one was a success! It scratched my horror itch. The characters were interesting and mostly likable, except for when they weren’t supposed to be. There was also a mental hospital, and y’all know I geek out over those! My main issues are relatively simple. The number of characters got a little overwhelming. And the perspective was constantly jumping between everybody. Chapter headings or some kind of marker would have been helpful. I also would have loved more background info on Charlie and Rose. It’s hinted at, but you know I love having as much info as possible. But other than that, Williams wraps up the story well and I liked the resolution. There were many places that were creepy; seeing the darker side of humanity is always fascinating! I would absolutely recommend Eternal Youth to the horror fans out there.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

I Hate My Brother by Branislav Bojčič

I Hate My Brother
Author:  Branislav Bojčič
Translators:
Suzana Stapar
Ksenija Gburčik
Published: February 18, 2020
148 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 4 stars

Book Description:

This book maybe answers the question of whether we can become a monster, or the monster already lies deep within us, waiting for the opportunity to come to the surface.

The action of this novel takes place in the region of ex-Yugoslavia as well as in prison and the court of The Hague Tribunal for war crimes.
The main character is Gvozden Mishic. He is courageous, honest, hard-working, and above all, a highly honorable man.

What happens when such a man of incredible persistence and will-power has his heart broken and filled with hatred?

Genocide.

This book represents a transformation, or rather a deformation of an impressive and above all, unique personality with countless qualities, among which the greatest is – an immense love for his family.

This quality is precisely his greatest fault. Love that he felt for his wife and daughter becomes an inexhaustible source of hatred that makes him commit deeds that give a new dimension and severity to the term “war crime.”

The severity that the readers will undoubtedly feel in their hearts while reading this book.

This book is nothing more than a profoundly emotional testimony of a tragedy of one people, carried on wings of hatred, hatred of those who once lived for LOVE, who once fought for LOVE.

Kim’s Review:

This was a very random find for me. It popped up while I was looking on Amazon and this cover intrigued me. It was a simple, straightforward read, while also presenting many complex ideas. It was a little difficult to understand the context so I would definitely suggest reading up on the Balkan conflict in the 90s. When borders are drawn by foreigners with no sense of nationality or ethnicity, problems will arise. Believe me, there are many times I wish people would just grow up and live peacefully, but I also get the roots of some conflicts. Gvozden wasn’t one of those people who cared too much about what happened outside his purview. He loved his life and he was proud of his heritage and his country, whatever that country was at that time. This is an account of one man. It’s not about the overall conflict, though of course that does come into play. Gvozden went from a peaceful farmer to one of the most infamous murderers of the entire conflict. I Hate My Brother shows his journey while also mirroring the bigger picture.

I really liked it and the emotions and ideas stuck with me. I think this would be good for more philosophically minded readers.

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest: Book Review and Movie Comparision

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
Author: Ken Kesey
Published: 1962
325 Pages

Reviewed By: Kim
Kim’s Rating: 5 stars

Book Description:

Tyrannical Nurse Ratched rules her ward in an Oregon State mental hospital with a strict and unbending routine, unopposed by her patients, who remain cowed by mind-numbing medication and the threat of electric shock therapy. But her regime is disrupted by the arrival of McMurphy – the swaggering, fun-loving trickster with a devilish grin who resolves to oppose her rules on behalf of his fellow inmates. His struggle is seen through the eyes of Chief Bromden, a seemingly mute half-Indian patient who understands McMurphy’s heroic attempt to do battle with the powers that keep them imprisoned. Ken Kesey’s extraordinary first novel is an exuberant, ribald and devastatingly honest portrayal of the boundaries between sanity and madness.

Kim’s Review:

Reading this book was a given for me. I had already seen the movie; plus I learned that they had used a working psych hospital and real patients for the movie. I found this gorgeous edition of the book and started reading. What a ride! I’ll admit that there’s not tons of action and the plot itself can be a little slow going, but the emotions and thinking and discussions and strategizing all make up for it!

This is one of those stories that has to be experienced in order to be understood. I will say this, the best thing to remember is that the narrator is a chronic psych patient. As long as that’s constantly understood, the perspective, surprisingly and ironically, makes much more sense! This is a book that will stick with you and you’ll be mentally gnawing on it for a good while after you finish! I also believe that everyone working in the mental health system should read this book! It’s so good, that I actually recommend it to everyone!

Now here is Kim’s Video Comparison of the movie:

 

Purchase Links:
Amazon US
Amazon UK

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